The trustees of Ireland’s national seminary have agreed to bring in a policy to protect whistleblowers after serious allegations were made about life in the college.

The statement followed a decision by Archbishop Diarmuid Martin of Dublin to remove his students from St Patrick’s College, Maynooth, after publicly raising misgivings about the life and governance of the 221-year old institution.

The archbishop referred to claims of what he described as a “gay culture” in the seminary and further allegations that some seminarians have been using a gay dating app. Archbishop Martin said some of the allegations had been shown to be true.

The seminary trustees – 13 senior Irish bishops, including Archbishop Martin – said in a statement that “there is no place in a seminary community for any sort of behaviour or attitude which contradicts the teaching and example of Jesus Christ.”

The statement said the trustees “share the concerns about the unhealthy atmosphere created by anonymous accusations, together with some social media comments which can be speculative or even malicious.”

The trustees agreed to “review current policies and procedures for reporting complaints with a view to adopting best practice procedures for ‘protected disclosures’ [whistle-blowing]”.

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